Cannabis Bag Seed

Bag Seed vs Hype Seed: Is it worth it to buy cannabis seeds? You found some cannabis seeds! Yay! Should you grow them? Or should you buy cannabis seeds online at an online seed bank like Seedsman Bag seeds are the obvious first choice for novice weed growers. Will bag seeds grow? Are they worth growing? Are they feminized? Find out! Many cannabis consumers have found an occasional seed in their bag of marijuana. But can you actually use them to grow your own weed? Learn more about germinating bag seeds and turning them into flourishing cannabis plants.

Bag Seed vs Hype Seed: Is it worth it to buy cannabis seeds?

You found some cannabis seeds! Yay! Should you grow them? Or should you buy cannabis seeds online at an online seed bank like Seedsman or Seed Supreme? What about on social media or even at a dispensary? How important are the marijuana seeds you start with?

Sometimes you get lucky with plants grown from found seeds. This bag seed produce excellent quality buds (though weirdly, the starting weed was not purple at all)

Unpredictability is the biggest downside to seeds you find in your weed. I have seen incredible grow results with “bag seed” or seeds growers find in their weed, like the plant pictured above. The higher the quality of the starting weed, the greater the chance the seeds will produce good buds, too. That being said, bag seed can have problems including bud quality, poor germination rates, the potential for hermies, and unpredictable growth patterns.

Poor Quality Seeds = Confidence Killer!

Using random cannabis seeds (even from dank bud) can produce unpredictable results. Plants may grow wild or produce small airy buds with low potency, even if the original weed was dense and potent.

Pros of Using “Bag Seed” (seeds you find in your weed)

  • Seeds are free (buying cannabis seeds can get expensive!)
  • Easy (you already have seeds in hand)
  • May produce good bud if it came from good buds

Cons of Using Bag Seed

  • Bud quality may not be as good as the weed it came in
  • Potential for poor germination rates since seeds likely weren’t stored properly
  • Unpredictable growth patterns – for example, plants may get tall or take a long time for buds to mature before harvest
  • Potential for male plants (male plants don’t produce buds while feminized seeds produce all-female, all bud-producing plants)
  • Hermies are common (hermie plants produce seedy buds, which is often how seeds got in your bud in the first place)

Today we’ll investigate those potential issues so you can make an informed decision. Let’s do a quick deep dive!

1.) Bud Quality

Genetics makes an enormous difference to your results. For example, the following two strains were grown in the same space with the same grow medium, nutrients, and grow light, yet the results were completely different.

These strains were grown in identical conditions. The green plant produced almost double the yields. The purple plant produced far less yields but the buds were denser, smoother to smoke, and almost twice as potent (14% THC vs 26% THC). When you buy seeds, you can choose what you like instead of the results being left to luck.

2.) Germination Rates

Germination is the process of getting your cannabis seeds to sprout and turn into seedlings. Typically, seeds are removed from buds and stored in a cool dry place to keep them fresh and viable. However, if the seeds have been sitting in your buds and the buds, it’s possible they weren’t stored in optimal conditions. That can cause you to have low or poor germination rates, even if you’re using a proven germination method.

“Found” seeds may have poor germination rates, for example, they may start germinating and “stall out” like this one did. It seemed healthy but never grew past this point.

3.) Growth Patterns

Using random seeds (even from dank bud) can produce unpredictable results. Plants may grow wild or produce small airy buds with low potency, even if the original weed was dense and potent. This is because the genetics weren’t stabilized to produce consistent results.

Bag seeds may grow in unexpected ways!

4.) Male Plants

Cannabis plants can be male or female, and with regular seeds, about half of plants are male. Female plants produce buds, but male plants only produce non-smokable pollen sacs. That means most growers want to throw away male plants so they don’t take up room in the grow space. On top of that, if the pollen sacs open up and release pollen on any nearby buds, those buds will get pollinated and end up with seeds in them. If you found seeds in your buds, there’s a strong chance that pollen got on the buds while they were forming.

Why am I explaining this in an article about bag seeds? Because when you’re growing from bag seed, there’s a strong chance that about half of your seeds will end up being male plants. This is important because male plants don’t produce buds and male flowers make your buds seedy. You need to be on the lookout for them.

Unless growing with feminized seeds, typically about half of all seeds will grow into male plants like this one. Male flowers are pollen sacs, which look like bunches of grapes.

After a few weeks, male flowers open up and pollen gets everywhere.

If any pollen gets on your buds, it will cause seeds to grow. This is one way that seeds can get in your buds.

Whenever using found seeds, you should determine the sex of young plants as soon as possible. This lets you toss all the male plants before they start making pollen and seeding your buds.

5.) Hermies (Hermaphrodite Plants)

The other main way seeds end up in your buds is from a hermaphrodite plant, or “hermie”. A hermaphrodite is a plant that produces both male and female flowers (both buds and pollen). The pollen from the male flowers pollinate buds and cause seeds to grow just like if a male plant released pollen.

See also  Cannabis Seed Companies Stock

Why is this important? Hermie seeds often produce hermaphrodite plants, which means your buds will likely have seeds in them.

Notice how these plants are producing both female flowers (buds) and male flowers (the pollen sacs are circled). Remove this plant immediately because once the pollen sacs open up they will seed all your buds.

Another type of hermie produces small yellow growths often called bananas (the “banana” would normally be found inside a pollen sac but on some plants it will grow exposed on the bud). Bananas start releasing pollen immediately and also cause seedy buds.

The best way to ensure all your plants end up being female is to start with feminized cannabis seeds from a trustworthy breeder. (Do feminized seeds make hermies?)

If you plan to use bag seed, just remember that there is a chance the resulting plants will be hermies. Keep an eye out for pollen sacs and bananas.

Should I buy seeds on social media like Instagram or Facebook?

Many growers get seeds from other people on social media sites like Instagram or Facebook. Can these seeds be trusted?

You need to be wary of any informal source of seeds, especially from people you don’t know and trust. There are many scammers taking advantage of growers by sending poor quality cannabis seeds or even no seeds. Try to find at least two legitimate people who have ordered successfully from the same source before you send any money. It sounds like a pain but it can save you a lot of time and money.

Additionally, there are many scammers that pretend to be legitimate companies. For example, several people on Instagram have copied our account (profile and posts) then messaged people to sell seeds as if they were us. Then they seed seeds of unknown quality or don’t send anything at all. If you’ve been following our actual Instagram account, you may not notice the seller is @growweedeasy_ instead of @growweedeasy.

Double and triple-check your source before ordering seeds through social media. Don’t throw money down the drain.

Or even better, just order seeds from a proven seed source that offers high-quality seeds and a plethora of excellent strains. If you’re lucky enough to live need a cannabis dispensary, you can sometimes find quality seeds there.

Be on the lookout for scams when buying seeds on social media. Consider a proven source of seeds.

Conclusion: Get Hype Seed if you Can!

Use found cannabis seeds at your own risk. You may get decent or even great results, but you may be disappointed, which can be a real confidence killer especially for new growers. There’s nothing more frustrating than doing everything right only to get bad results after 4 months of growing. I highly recommend buying at least a few seeds from a trustworthy breeder to ensure you are happy with the weed you grow at the end.

Not sure where to get seeds? Learn where to safely buy seeds online. Learn about American genetics.

One awesome strain that won’t break the bank (3 seeds for $30) is Critical Purple Kush. I’ve grown it in different setups and buds produce smooth and relaxing effects. A crowd favorite.

Critical Purple Kush buds are sparkly with great yields, plant growth, and bud quality.

Looking for reaaaally potent buds and don’t mind paying a little extra? Check out Platinum Cookies (4 seeds for $55)

Bag Seeds and What to Expect of Them

Is it a good idea to grow cannabis from bag seeds? Will the final product be potent enough? Are you going to get feminized or regular plants? We give answers to these and other questions.

Novice growers keep asking questions about bag seeds all the time. A girl I know has recently fired at me a series of questions that she thought no one would ever answer. I’m sure at least some of you have been as puzzled by these questions as her. Here it goes:

I’ve been asking everyone about these bag weed seeds, and no one can explain this to me. Because I swear to God I can’t understand it myself. If the buds haven’t been pollinated, then the seeds should be sterile. But they aren’t! I’ve germinated one such seed myself, and it was growing fine.

If the buds HAVE been pollinated, then why the f… they are making me high?!

And if it was a feminized plant, is it normal for feminized plants to produce seeds?

Questions like these made me realize that people don’t grasp the concept of bag seeds. Moreover, there is a fundamental lack of understanding of how and why cannabis plants produce seeds. Can all of them be grown? Are all of them worth growing? How different types of seeds (feminized, autoflowering, regular, hermies, etc.) fit into the picture? In this post, I’ll try to bring clarity to these issues.

Table of Contents

Bag Seeds Meaning

Suppose you buy some buds in a ‘bag’ (a zip lock). You expect the buds to be high quality which means—among other things—that they’ll be without seeds. The buds really do look, smell and taste great, and make you high, too. However, when grinding them, you find a seed or two. And this is what we call ‘bag seeds’.

Will Bag Seeds Grow?

Most seeds you find in a zip lock will definitely grow. For plants, seeds are a means of reproduction. They aren’t just for show. Of course, there are sterile or infertile seeds in other crops that have been artificially modified, but not in cannabis. So these seeds grow like any other: they germinate, they sprout, they get bigger, and then you see your bag seeds flowering as any other type of marijuana would.

This is because the presence of seeds always means that there has been some natural pollination. Either there was some undetected male somewhere near the grow, or there were some stray male pollen sacks in female buds. The latter occurs much more often because female plants often grow a few male flowers due to stress (so called hermies, or hermaphrodites). But, no matter where the pollen has come from, the pollination leads to the production of seeds, and these seeds are fertile.

See also  Pure Indica Cannabis Seeds

So, if you ask yourself: “Can I grow bag seeds?”, the answer is always ‘yes’. Can bag seeds grow good weed? Well, it’s another question. Read on.

Are Bag Seeds Worth Growing?

Growing unknown bag seeds is always a toss of a coin. Even if you like the buds in which you have found these seeds, it doesn’t mean you’ll get the same quality. Let’s put it this way: you’ve now met the mother (the buds you’ve just smoked), but you don’t know anything about the father (the source of pollen). It may have been outstanding, it may have been mediocre, or it may have been the most worthless ditch weed that grows in your area.

And don’t forget that the father could also have been another mother (a hermaphrodite plant). So do bag seeds work? Yes, they do. Are bag seeds any good? Well, this depends on the quality of both parents, and you simply don’t have enough information.

Having said that, a bag seed can be a real gem. You probably have heard stories of first rate strains that have been bred from seeds found in a bag of buds. One example is the famous Cinderella. It would be an irreparable loss for the marijuana growing community if the breeders of this masterpiece simply sneered at those seeds and threw them away.

Bag Seeds vs Seeds Bought in a Seed Shop

If you simply want to grow yourself some good bud and expect reliable results, by all means buy your beans online from a reputable seed shop.

The reasons to grow weed from bag seeds are very few:

  • if you suspect that your bag seeds could be amazing and feel lucky (because you’ll need PLENTY of luck),
  • when your budget is strained to spend any money on seeds,
  • if you want to grow a lot plants outdoors in the cheapest way possible.

What we don’t recommend is growing bag seeds indoors. With the cost of the setup and electricity bills and what not, the money you spend on seeds is arguably the least significant expense item.

Some Questions about the Genetics

If you have read carefully what we have said above, you’ve already guessed that bag seeds, like any other type of weed seeds, can be really anything (in terms of their genetics). But, for clarity’s sake, let’s answer any specific questions that you might have.

Are Bag Seeds Feminized?

Whether the seeds found in buds are feminized or not depends on the source of the pollination. If the pollen was from a male plant, the seeds will be regular, meaning that the ratio of male to female plants will be around 50/50. But if the source of the pollen were male flowers (hermies) from the same plant or another female/hermie plant in the garden, the resulting bag seeds are feminized. Please note that such seeds are also very prone to become hermies if you subject them to stress.

Obviously, the only way to tell if your bags seeds are feminized or regular is to grow and flower them.

Are All Bag Seeds Hermies?

Most female plants can become hermies if you subject them to stress. It all depends on the amount of stress needed before you see male flowers in your female buds. If the buds have been pollinated by a male (see above), they will show more stability. If they have been pollinated by a hermie, watch out because even the least amount of stress can make such plants ‘turn to the dark side’.

On average, bag seeds are way less stable than store-bought seeds.

Can Bag Seeds be Autoflower?

If both parents were autos, the seeds are 100% autoflowering, too. The same if an autoflower self-pollinated itself (see our experiment where we produced our own feminized seeds by self-pollination using colloidal silver).

Is it Normal for Fem Plants to Produce Seeds?

Fem plants produce seeds just like any other type of plant (if you pollinate them). It doesn’t matter whether you have grown a plant from fem seeds or regular. Neither type is infertile. Of course, bud growers do everything they can to produce buds without seeds, but shit happens, doesn’t it?

Can Buds With Seeds Make You High?

The potency of buds is a matter of genetics, and not of whether the buds have been pollinated or not. Of course, buds with seeds have inferior quality because a pollinated plant directs all its energy to seed production and not resin production. Seeded buds are smaller, have less resin glands and lower levels of THC, but they DO make you high nevertheless. With many seeds, the quality is significantly worse. With a few, you’ll probably see no difference.

This is it. We hope we have answered all your questions. If not, don’t be shy to ask in comments.

How to Germinate a Bag Seed

F inding a seed in your bag of weed used to be regarded as an insult, an indication you scored some inferior product. But it’s a new millennium, and growing cannabis is perfectly legal in some states and territories. While buying seeds online is still recommended for reasons we will detail further, finding a healthy seed can be as valuable as an ounce of gold. Or at least the cost of the bag.

Related Articles

  • Can You Tell if a Cannabis Seed is Male or Female?
  • How to Store Marijuana Seeds Properly
  • Feminized Cannabis Seeds Explained
  • How to Start Seeds

In this article we review the steps to germinate cannabis seeds, tips and tricks in the process, and how to keep your seedling healthy.

Germinating a seed is the first step in the growing process, and a cannabis seed will sprout with a voracious hunger, so if you are about to germinate seeds, start thinking ahead about where the seedling will eventually be moved to. This includes lighting, ventilation, and something to feed the lady. Those things don’t need to be decided before you begin, but try to have a plan in place by the time the second set of leaves emerges — as soon as two weeks.

See also  Revolution With Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil

The Germination Process

Begin by soaking the seed overnight. Soaking the seed saturates it with moisture, and moving it shortly after to a warm home tells the seed that it’s someplace comfortable, and it’s time to grow. Tap water is fine for this, but a micronutrient solution like liquid seaweed may be included.

Once your seed has soaked, the most common method for germination is the “paper towel method.” Wet a piece of paper towel and wring dry, then fold in half. Place the seeds between the halves of the damp paper towel, and slide the whole thing into a ziplock bag. Seal with some air inside. Leave this bag someplace comfortably warm for about a week, checking frequently for spots of mold. After about a week, a taproot should emerge.

Then it is time to transfer the seed into a proper growing medium. Be careful plucking your seed from the paper towel!

A grow medium is the “stuff” the seed will sit in. The easiest option is soil, healthy black earthy scooped up from your yard, or potting soil purchased from any garden center. Rock wool cubes are a common option for hydroponic growers, but can later be transplanted into soil as well. Compost and worm castings are great for a seedling, but it will need to be transplanted into a more diverse mixture later.

It is far too early to begin any nutrient cycle, or to introduce any fertilizers to the soil. Now that the seed is confirmed as alive, and placed into a more comfortable medium, simply make sure that the seed is watered and warm.

The first set of leaves to emerge are called “sucker leaves,” and their sole purpose is to drink in as much light as possible to fuel the growth of the more recognizable serrated leaves, which will begin to grow over the next week. After that you’ve got a proper seedling, and in a few weeks it will be ready for a bigger home!

For further guidance and resources about growing cannabis, see our Beginner’s Guide to Growing Marijuana, or our guide to growing for personal use.

Cultivating a Healthy Cannabis Seedling

The seedling that emerges will be as tender as an infant, and susceptible to diseases and cross-contaminations, so keep your germination station as sanitary as possible, and wash your hands before handling them. Avoid rubber or latex gloves at this stage as they have too much grip, and one wrong movement of your finger could accidentally grab and tear the soft plant material.

A seed’s health may be fortified by soaking it with a solution rich in micronutrients, like liquid seaweed. Be advised, however, that these will be very diluted solutions. Carefully read the mixing instructions of any product you purchase.

Seedlings can be protected against certain diseases by including worm castings in the medium. Research out of Cornell University has shown the microbial life in worm castings colonizes the seed’s surface, making it more difficult for pathogenic microbes to establish themselves.

Disclaimers and Downsides Regarding Found Seeds

It’s worth pausing to remember that seeds shouldn’t wind up in your bag of cured, smokable cannabis. So before planting anything, let’s assess what this seed is, and how it got there.

Only female cannabis plants produce flowers, and if they are pollinated by male plants, then they produce seeds instead. So all the cannabis we smoke is from unpollinated female plants — or nearly all of it.

When female plants are stressed — for instance, by drought conditions or nutrient problems — an evolutionary alarm can induce them to produce seeds with only their DNA. The problem with these “hermaphrodite seeds” is that the offspring, having benefited from this process, will be more prone to repeat it. If this is how a seed got in your bag, it can result in seedy weed, even under the closest care.

A seed is not guaranteed to sprout at all. Examine the seed for any obvious health issues. Immature seeds are lighter greys-to-green, while mature seeds are darker tan, brown, or even black. A healthy shape is a teardrop or nearly round, while bunk seeds will appear shrivelled or irregular. Finally, healthy seeds have a hard, whole shell, while cracked or brittle shells will likely not sprout, or produce a less healthy seedling.

A found seed is also not a guarantee to produce a replica of the strain you smoked, and may present latent traits from the strains it was bred from. Cultivating a complete copy of a phenotype is called “cloning,” and the cloning process must begin with a living plant, not a seed.

Remember, it could also just result in a male plant, which won’t grow any buds. None of this is guaranteed to happen with a bag seed, it’s just more likely than with a stabilized seed from a producer.

Summary

If you want to germinate a seed you’ve found, begin by soaking it overnight in water to saturate it, and soften the shell. Micronutrient solutions can be mixed in at this stage to fortify the health of the seedling (if you do, be sure to read the mixing instructions on the label).

The “paper towel method” is the most accessible way of germinating almost any seed. Once a taproot has emerged (after about a week) plant the seed into a small container with your chosen grow medium, like soil. Do not fertilize at this stage, as the seed and resulting seedling are very tender, and concentrated fertilizers are abrasive chemicals. Within another week, “sucker leaves” will sprout, synthesizing light to produce further growth.

Remember, found seeds are not always healthy or even viable. A healthy seed has a hard, unbroken shell and a dark color, while brittle or misshapen seeds may not produce a healthy plant, if anything at all. A found seed is also not guaranteed to replicate the precise phenotype of that cannabis you found it in.

That said, it’s almost always worth trying, and experimenting with whatever results. Growing cannabis can be an enriching experience, and perhaps even save you some riches. As long as you know what to look for from a seed, and how to handle them, finding one in your bag could be a golden ticket.